everywhere diffused

Part Art Process blog, all self-reflexive struggle with anxiety under the burden of creative genius
idrawtomhanks:

Still and catchphrase from everyone’s favorite Tim Hank film, “Jeremy McGuire.” $9000

idrawtomhanks:

Still and catchphrase from everyone’s favorite Tim Hank film, “Jeremy McGuire.” $9000

kadrey:

Jim Jarmusch’s 5 Golden Rules for Filmmakers
Rule #1: There are no rules. There are as many ways to make a film as there are potential filmmakers. It’s an open form. Anyway, I would personally never presume to tell anyone else what to do or how to do anything. To me that’s like telling someone else what their religious beliefs should be. Fuck that. That’s against my personal philosophy—more of a code than a set of “rules.” Therefore, disregard the “rules” you are presently reading, and instead consider them to be merely notes to myself. One should make one’s own “notes” because there is no one way to do anything. If anyone tells you there is only one way, their way, get as far away from them as possible, both physically and philosophically.
Rule #2: Don’t let the fuckers get ya. They can either help you, or not help you, but they can’t stop you. People who finance films, distribute films, promote films and exhibit films are not filmmakers. They are not interested in letting filmmakers define and dictate the way they do their business, so filmmakers should have no interest in allowing them to dictate the way a film is made. Carry a gun if necessary.
Also, avoid sycophants at all costs. There are always people around who only want to be involved in filmmaking to get rich, get famous, or get laid. Generally, they know as much about filmmaking as George W. Bush knows about hand-to-hand combat.
Rule #3: The production is there to serve the film. The film is not there to serve the production. Unfortunately, in the world of filmmaking this is almost universally backwards. The film is not being made to serve the budget, the schedule, or the resumes of those involved. Filmmakers who don’t understand this should be hung from their ankles and asked why the sky appears to be upside down.
Rule #4: Filmmaking is a collaborative process. You get the chance to work with others whose minds and ideas may be stronger than your own. Make sure they remain focused on their own function and not someone else’s job, or you’ll have a big mess. But treat all collaborators as equals and with respect. A production assistant who is holding back traffic so the crew can get a shot is no less important than the actors in the scene, the director of photography, the production designer or the director. Hierarchy is for those whose egos are inflated or out of control, or for people in the military. Those with whom you choose to collaborate, if you make good choices, can elevate the quality and content of your film to a much higher plane than any one mind could imagine on its own. If you don’t want to work with other people, go paint a painting or write a book. (And if you want to be a fucking dictator, I guess these days you just have to go into politics…).
Rule #5: Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is nonexistent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery—celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.”

http://sieder3.com/acting_atelier_munich/2013/06/10/jim-jarmuschs-5-golden-rules-for-filmmakers/

Okey Doke.

kadrey:

Jim Jarmusch’s 5 Golden Rules for Filmmakers

Rule #1: There are no rules. There are as many ways to make a film as there are potential filmmakers. It’s an open form. Anyway, I would personally never presume to tell anyone else what to do or how to do anything. To me that’s like telling someone else what their religious beliefs should be. Fuck that. That’s against my personal philosophy—more of a code than a set of “rules.” Therefore, disregard the “rules” you are presently reading, and instead consider them to be merely notes to myself. One should make one’s own “notes” because there is no one way to do anything. If anyone tells you there is only one way, their way, get as far away from them as possible, both physically and philosophically.

Rule #2: Don’t let the fuckers get ya. They can either help you, or not help you, but they can’t stop you. People who finance films, distribute films, promote films and exhibit films are not filmmakers. They are not interested in letting filmmakers define and dictate the way they do their business, so filmmakers should have no interest in allowing them to dictate the way a film is made. Carry a gun if necessary.

Also, avoid sycophants at all costs. There are always people around who only want to be involved in filmmaking to get rich, get famous, or get laid. Generally, they know as much about filmmaking as George W. Bush knows about hand-to-hand combat.

Rule #3: The production is there to serve the film. The film is not there to serve the production. Unfortunately, in the world of filmmaking this is almost universally backwards. The film is not being made to serve the budget, the schedule, or the resumes of those involved. Filmmakers who don’t understand this should be hung from their ankles and asked why the sky appears to be upside down.

Rule #4: Filmmaking is a collaborative process. You get the chance to work with others whose minds and ideas may be stronger than your own. Make sure they remain focused on their own function and not someone else’s job, or you’ll have a big mess. But treat all collaborators as equals and with respect. A production assistant who is holding back traffic so the crew can get a shot is no less important than the actors in the scene, the director of photography, the production designer or the director. Hierarchy is for those whose egos are inflated or out of control, or for people in the military. Those with whom you choose to collaborate, if you make good choices, can elevate the quality and content of your film to a much higher plane than any one mind could imagine on its own. If you don’t want to work with other people, go paint a painting or write a book. (And if you want to be a fucking dictator, I guess these days you just have to go into politics…).

Rule #5: Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is nonexistent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery—celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.”

http://sieder3.com/acting_atelier_munich/2013/06/10/jim-jarmuschs-5-golden-rules-for-filmmakers/

Okey Doke.

thesandworm:

amazing/hilarious/illuminating interview with david lynch where he answers questions he visibly dislikes by discussing the filmmaking process, the power of interpretation, and the pitfalls of explaining too much. i have this same argument with myself frequently.

February 15th

The sun humbles us. I learned this on my walk back from the supermarket to buy apples and V8. When I became a man, I put away childish things. Each trying gulp of metallic vegetable concentrate brings me closer to the pleasure of enjoying it. I drank my first can in the sun. I had to look away, look down. Nothing is quite so pleasurable as basking in a sun ray, as countless house pets can attest. And dust mites too, maybe. As I walked to the store, upright and balanced, feeling connected to every living and non-living thing around me, I saw the drivers in their cars, coming toward me. I tried to make eye contact. “We’ll get through this together” I wanted to say to them. Most of them had their visors down, squinting or grimacing at the sun. 

Maybe we shouldn’t drive toward the sun. If we must drive toward the sun, maybe we should apologize to the sun when we have to drop down our visors or put on sunglasses. Not because the sun cares, but because we care about the sun. We care enough to humble ourselves before its blinding light - not because it stings our eyes - but because it brings warmth and peace into our lives. None of this is new. But I don’t think it’s ever been this possible for us all to pull in the same direction. Maybe that’s just part of enlightenment, the belief that it’s all finally possible.

Atheists say religious people shouldn’t indoctrinate their children, that it’s child abuse. They are afraid of what the religious have become. I think religion was made for children. It’s perfectly suited to them and every child should be exposed. We haven’t figured out that daddy is Santa Claus. That someday we’ll get to play Santa Claus too. We have to give up our toys. I ate an apple afterward. An apple tastes almost too sweet after a V8. It was delicious. Do I dare to eat a peach?

 

I’ll have more art up soon.


David Lynch’s hair compared to famous paintings.

David Lynch’s hair compared to famous paintings.

(Source: downstreamcolor)

I think, maybe, I’ll just shoot dumb videos with my cell phone until that pays off somehow.

I think that I am adorable.

Got sick of drawing people I like, and being frustrated that the renderings were unflattering. Hence: Speidi. Also hammering out some anatomy. 

Got sick of drawing people I like, and being frustrated that the renderings were unflattering. Hence: Speidi. Also hammering out some anatomy.